Remembering the “Clinic of Legal Defense to Recover Salaries”

Jornaleros en la calle Cesar Chavez frente a su centro jornalero en San Francisco. Day Laborers on Cesar Chavez St. in front of their day labor center in San Francisco. Photography: Courtesy of Sahar Khoury.

Jornaleros en la calle Cesar Chavez frente a su centro jornalero en San Francisco. Day Laborers on Cesar Chavez St. in front of their day labor center in San Francisco. Photography: Courtesy of Sahar Khoury.

Eight years ago I participated in the initial development of the group Unidos through La Raza Centro Legal (LRCL); this group was known as “the clinic of legal defense to recover salaries”.

I give credit to graduate Hillary Ronan because of her effort and dedication to establish the group. The group consisted of one lawyer, Hillary Ronan, six college volunteers, and four jornaleros [day laborers]. This exchange of ideas and experiences between volunteers, day laborers, and other workers, made the clinic dynamic and yielded positive results.

“At the beginning few people came, but when people found out about the clinic, a lot of people started to come. It was a very complex and effective project. They took us to some training programs which taught us how to communicate with people and the type of information we had to give them,” said a colleague from DLP who also participated in the group.

“They gave us trainings to become familiar with the bureaucratic process, necessary documentation, and how to refer to the commission’s office for minor complaints. Each person was given the information needed to decide if a lawsuit was established or not,” shared a member of La Colectiva de Mujeres.

“There was a very controversial case with a domestic worker, Vilma Seralta, who suffered abuse, mistreatment, and who was given excessive work. It was a case that lawyer Ronan adopted and took to victory. Vilma recovered a big part of the money she hadn’t been paid for her work, a victory that otherwise she couldn’t have accomplished,” she added.

After a person submitted a complaint with a lawyer, there were several steps to file a complaint. First the employer was called, and then a letter was sent. If there was no answer, another written notice was sent.  If, after these steps, the employer didn’t answer, the complaint was filed.

In order to file a complaint, it is important that the workers know their employer. My advice is that you take notes in a notepad with the hours, the days, and the place you worked, but above all, record the first and last name of the employer. Take his address, and if possible his driver’s license number.

All this information is needed to file a wage theft complaint, and was of great help for the workers in “the clinic of legal defense to recover salaries” through LRCL.

By: Jose Ramirez

Translate by: Jimena Kirk

Advertisements

Recordando la “clínica de defensoría legal para recuperación de sueldos”

 

Jornaleros en la calle Cesar Chavez frente a su centro jornalero en San Francisco. Day Laborers on Cesar Chavez St. in front of their day labor center in San Francisco. Photography: Courtesy of Sahar Khoury.

Jornaleros en la calle Cesar Chavez frente a su centro jornalero en San Francisco. Day Laborers on Cesar Chavez St. in front of their day labor center in San Francisco. Photography: Courtesy of Sahar Khoury.

Hace 8 años participé en el desarrollo inicial del grupo Unidos a través de La Raza Centro Legal (LRCL); grupo que fue conocido como la “clínica de defensoría legal para recuperación de sueldos”.

Reconozco el mérito de la licenciada Hillary Ronan por su esfuerzo y entrega para formar este grupo. El grupo consistía de una abogada, Hillary Ronan, seis voluntarios universitarios y cuatro jornaleros. Este intercambio de ideas y experiencias entre voluntarios, jornaleros y otros trabajadores hacia que estas clínicas fuesen dinámicas y dieran resultados positivos.

“Al principio llegaba poca gente pero cuando supieron de esta clínica comenzaron a acudir bastantes. Fue un proyecto bueno y muy completo. Nos llevaron a algunos entrenamientos y nos enseñaron como hablar con las personas y la información que les teníamos que dar”, dijo un compañero del DLP que también participó en el grupo.

“Nos daban entrenamientos para conocer la papelería [la documentación necesaria y el proceso burocrático] que había allí y como referirse a la oficina de la comisión para reclamos menores. A cada persona se le daba la información que necesitaba y así cada quien decidía si establecía una demanda o no”, compartió una miembro de La Colectiva de Mujeres.

“Hubo un caso muy controversial de una trabajadora doméstica—Vilma Seralta quien sufrió abuso, maltrato y se le daba trabajo excesivo. Fue un caso que tomó la Lic. Hillary y lo llevó a la victoria. Vilma recuperó gran parte del dinero que no se le había pagado por su trabajo—algo que de otra manera no hubiese logrado”, agregó.

Luego de que la persona sometía un reclamo con la abogada existían varios pasos para presentar la demanda. Primero se le llamaba al empleador. Luego se le enviaba una carta. Si no había una respuesta se le volvía a notificar por escrito. Si después de todos estos pasos el empleador no respondía se presentaba la demanda.

Para poder presentar una demanda es importante que los trabajadores conozcan al empleador. Tu puedes tomar nota en una libreta de las horas que trabajaste, los días trabajados, el lugar de trabajo, pero sobre todo, saber el nombre y apellido del empleador. Anota su dirección y si es posible su número de licencia de conducir.

Toda esta información se necesita para presentar un reclamo de robo de sueldo. Estos datos sirven como pruebas y fueron de gran ayuda para los trabajadores en la “clínica de defensoría legal para recuperación de sueldos” a través de LRCL.

Por: Jose Ramirez-miembro del DLP

New Wage Lien Bill Would Avoid Wage Theft

21 de febrero, 2013. Supervisor del distrito de la Mision, David Campos, celebra el liderazgo de grupos comunitarios tras ganar el acuerdo de sueldos no pagados. $525 000 cifra más alta en la historia de SF. February 21, 2013. Mission District Supervisor David Campos celebrates the leadership of community organizations in winning the largest settlement of unpaid wages.$525 000 highest number in SF history. Photography: Emiliano Bourgois-Chacon.

21 de febrero, 2013. Supervisor del distrito de la Mision, David Campos, celebra el liderazgo de grupos comunitarios tras ganar el acuerdo de sueldos no pagados. $525 000 cifra más alta en la historia de SF. February 21, 2013. Mission District Supervisor David Campos celebrates the leadership of community organizations in winning the largest settlement of unpaid wages.$525 000 highest number in SF history. Photography: Emiliano Bourgois-Chacon.

Wage liens are an old remedy to injustices committed against workers who are not paid their wages. Currently NDLON-California and the Wage Lien Coalition are organizing to pass the California Wage Lien Bill.

The CA Wage Lien was initially introduced two years ago in the Assembly as AB 2517 (Eng, D-Monterey Park), but did not gather the necessary votes to pass and died in the Assembly floor, due to the efforts of the California Building Industry Association (CBIA) and its coalition.

“Last year there were only 4 or 5 organizations behind the Wage Lien Bill and it didn’t pass because of opposition from banks, mortgage company brokers and big business interests,” said Charlotte Noss, Skadden Fellow of The Legal Aid Society-Employment Law Center.

This year there are at least 26 legal organizations, work centers and labor unions backing the bill including The Legal Aid Society, the California Immigrant Policy Center, the Clean Carwash Campaign in LA and the California Labor Federation.
Currently, the Mechanics Lien Law exists as a method to ensure that only construction workers are adequately compensated for their labor. With this, construction workers who are owed money can go to the county reporters office and file a lawsuit, which will hold the owner liable for wages not paid—making it hard to sell that property.

Also, Mechanics Lien Law only allows 90 after the work stops to file the lien, and 90 subsequent days to file an action to enforce it. This lien does not include penalties for unpaid wages and applies only to the property where the work was done—not the employer.
The new CA Wage Lien Bill will expand on the Mechanics Lien allowing workers from all industries to file a lien without an attorney. It will also give the worker one year to file a lien and another to litigate if wages are not paid. The lien will apply the owner’s property and all property related to work, and will collect unpaid salaries, penalties, interests, and attorney fees.

In San Francisco, no group since “Grupo Unido” which closed in 2009 has been formed to defend day laborers in a practical and legal manner. “The Grupo Unido Clinic opened 25 times per year. In the beginning they only took on 4 or 5 cases per year, and then took on about 20 per year. In 2009 $130,000 were recovered in unpaid wages for day laborers and between $80,000 and $90,000 dollars in 2008,” said Jose Ramirez, member of the San Francisco Day Labor Program and former collaborator of Grupo Unido.

According to Noss, the most impactful strategy against opposition is for workers to go to Sacramento to tell their stories and testify with legislators. The CA Wage Lien Coalition is currently looking for a legislator to author the bill.

By Marianella Aguirre

Nuevo proyecto de ley evitaría robo de sueldo

21 de febrero, 2013. Supervisor del distrito de la Mision, David Campos, celebra el liderazgo de grupos comunitarios tras ganar el acuerdo de sueldos no pagados. $525 000 cifra más alta en la historia de SF. February 21, 2013. Mission District Supervisor David Campos celebrates the leadership of community organizations in winning the largest settlement of unpaid wages.$525 000 highest number in SF history. Photography: Emiliano Bourgois-Chacon.

21 de febrero, 2013. Supervisor del distrito de la Mision, David Campos, celebra el liderazgo de grupos comunitarios tras ganar el acuerdo de sueldos no pagados. $525 000 cifra más alta en la historia de SF. February 21, 2013. Mission District Supervisor David Campos celebrates the leadership of community organizations in winning the largest settlement of unpaid wages.$525 000 highest number in SF history. Photography: Emiliano Bourgois-Chacon.

El derecho de retención es un viejo remedio para curar las injusticias cometidas en contra de los trabajadores a quienes no se les paga. Actualmente la Red Nacional Organizadora de Jornaleros de California (NDLON) y la Coalición de Derecho de Retención se están organizando para que se pase el proyecto de ley “Derecho de Retención de California”.

El Derecho de Retención de California se introdujo hace dos años a la asamblea como AB 2517 (Eng, D-Monterey Park). Sin embargo no se reunieron los votos necesarios para ser aprobada y murió en el recinto de la asamblea debido a los esfuerzos de la Asociación de Industrias de la Construcción de California (CBIA) y su coalición.

“El año pasado fueron sólo 4 o 5 organizaciones las que apoyaron en el proyecto de ley Derecho de Retención y no pasó debido a la oposición de bancos, compañías de agentes hipotecarios y por grandes intereses comerciales”, dijo Charlotte Noss, Skadden Fellow de The Legal Aid Society-Employment Law Center.

Este año serán por lo menos 26 organizaciones, centros de trabajo y sindicatos los que apoyarán el proyecto de ley. Entre ellos están The Legal Aid Society, California Immigrant Policy Center, Clean Carwash Campaign en Los Angeles y California Labor Federation.

En la actualidad existe el Mecanismo de Derecho de Retención (Mechanics Lien Law) como método que garantiza que los trabajadores de construcción sean adecuadamente compensados por su trabajo. Con esto, trabajadores a los que se le debe dinero pueden ir a una oficina del condado y presentar una demanda contra el dueño de la propiedad. Con dicha demanda el trabajador reclama una deuda sobre la propiedad y hace responsable al propietario por los salarios no pagados—logrando así que dicha propiedad sea difícil de vender.

Por otra parte, el Mecanismo de Derecho de Retención sólo da un plazo de 90 días luego de finalizar el trabajo para presentar una demanda y otros 90 días para poner en proceso la querella. Este gravamen no incluye el pago de penalidades por los sueldos no pagados al trabajador y sólo es aplicable a la propiedad donde se hizo el trabajo—más no al empleador.
Esta nuevo proyecto de ley busca mejorar el mecanismo de derecho de retención permitiendo que  trabajadores de todas las industrias puedan presentar una demanda sin necesidad de un abogado. También daría al trabajador un año para presentar la demanda y otro año para litigar si no se le llegó a pagar. Este gravamen se aplicará a la propiedad del dueño y a cualquier bien relacionado con el trabajo. A través de este gravamen sueldos no pagados, penalidades, intereses, y gastos de servicios legales serán subvencionados.

En San Francisco no ha existido otro grupo desde “Grupo Unido”, el cual cerró en el 2009, que se haya formando con el fin de defender a jornaleros de manera práctica y legal. “La clínica de Grupo Unido abría 25 veces al año. Al comienzo sólo tomó de 4 a 5 casos por año y luego llegó a tomar hasta 20. En el 2009, $130 000 fueron recuperados en salarios no pagados a jornaleros y entre $80 000 y $90 000 en el 2008”, dijo José Ramírez, miembro del Programa de Jornaleros de San Francisco y ex colaborador del Grupo Unido.

Según Noss, la estrategia más efectiva contra la oposición es que trabajadores vayan a Sacramento, cuenten sus historias y las testifiquen con legisladores. Actualmente la coalición de Derecho de Retención de California esta buscando un legislador que sea autor del proyecto de ley.

Por: Marianella Aguirre

How is International Women’s Day Celebrated?

Marcha por el día internacional de la mujer en Dolores Park, San Francisco. Rally for International Women's Day at Dolores Park, San Francisco. Photography: Guillermo Lopez.

Marcha por el día internacional de la mujer en Dolores Park, San Francisco. Rally for International Women’s Day at Dolores Park, San Francisco. Photography: Guillermo Lopez.

Demonstrations around the world denouncing violence and injustices that women face on a daily basis is the way people celebrate International Women’s Day each year on March 8th.

“There is one universal truth, applicable to all countries, cultures and communities: violence against women is never acceptable, never excusable, never tolerable,” is the message of Bank Ki-moon, Secretary of the United Nations for International Women’s Day. This year’s motto, “A promise is a promise: time for action to end violence against women,” seeks to strengthen the international community’s commitment through their campaign UNITE: To End Violence Against Women, which encourages people to correct this plague on society.

San Francisco also joined the fight against women’s violence. The organization WORD (Women Organized to Resist and Defend) organized a rally at Dolores Park on March 9th, advocating for gender equality and denouncing violence against women. Rallies at the local, national, and international level took place around the world celebrating the achievements of the feminist movement and supporting women’s rights.

On March 7th Tom Ammiano, San Francisco assemblyman, marched with domestic workers and organizations such as the Women’s Collective in Los Angeles celebrating the reintroduction of the CA Domestic Workers Bill of Rights (AB 241)—vetoed by Governor Brown. This new Bill will focus on the following rights: overtime, meal and rest breaks, three paid sick days, workers’ compensation, the right to use kitchen facilities, and the right to have specified hours to sleep.

To support this fight for Domestic Worker’s rights, please visit the National Domestic Workers Alliance website at: http://www.domesticworkers.org/, or get involved locally through the Women’s Collective  located at 3358 Cesar Chavez Street in San Francisco.

By Maria Pia Kirk Berastain

¿Cómo se celebra el día internacional de la mujer?

Marcha por el día internacional de la mujer en Dolores Park, San Francisco. Rally for International Women's Day at Dolores Park, San Francisco. Photography: Guillermo Lopez.

Marcha por el día internacional de la mujer en Dolores Park, San Francisco. Rally for International Women’s Day at Dolores Park, San Francisco. Photography: Guillermo Lopez.

Por Maria Pia Kirk Berastain

Demostraciones en distintas partes del mundo en contra de la violencia e injusticias que enfrentan las mujeres a diario es la manera como se celebra el día internacional de la mujer cada 8 de marzo.

“Existe una verdad universal, aplicable a todos los países, culturas y comunidades: la violencia contra la mujer nunca es aceptable, nunca es perdonable, nunca tolerable”, es el mensaje del Secretario General de la ONU (Organización de las Naciones Unidas), Bank Ki-moon, por el día Internacional de la Mujer. El lema de este año, “Una promesa es una promesa: Acabemos con la violencia en contra de la mujer”, busca reforzar el compromiso de la comunidad internacional a través de la campaña “UNETE: Fin a la violencia contra las mujeres” y de esa manera hace un llamado para corregir este mal.

San Francisco también se unió a la lucha contra la violencia. La organización WORD (Mujeres Organizadas para Resistir y Defender) organizó una marcha el 9 de marzo en Dolores Park para defender la igualdad de géneros y denunciar la violencia contra la mujer. Marchas a nivel local, nacional y mundial ocurrieron en todas partes del mundo celebrando los logros del movimiento feminista y apoyando a la lucha por los derechos de las mujeres.

Tom Ammiano, legislador de San Francisco, acompañado de trabajadoras domesticas y organizaciones de apoyo como La Colectiva de Mujeres, marcharon en Los Ángeles el 7 de marzo celebrando la reintroducción de la Carta de Derechos para Trabajadores/as domésticas en California (AB 241)—la cual fue vetada por el gobernador Brown. Los puntos más importantes que incluirá esta carta de derechos son el pago de horas extras trabajadas, derecho a comidas y descansos, 3 días de trabajo pagados por enfermedad, compensación, derecho a preparar su propia comida o uso de la cocina, y derecho a horas de sueño.

Para apoyar esta lucha por los derechos de las trabajadoras domésticas visite la página de internet de Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras Domesticas: http://www.domesticworkers.org/, o involúcrese de manera local a través de La Colectiva de Mujeres. La oficina está localizada en 3358 Cesar Chávez Street en San Francisco, California.

Women’s Collective in National Survey

De izquierda a derecha/From Left to right: Emiliana Acopio, Sylvia López, Maria Aguilar, Maria Reyes, and Guillermina Castellanos en conferencia de prensa/at the press conference. Photo: Damarys Cuevas.

De izquierda a derecha/From Left to right: Emiliana Acopio, Sylvia López, Maria Aguilar, Maria Reyes, and Guillermina Castellanos en conferencia de prensa/at the press conference. Photo: Damarys Cuevas.

By Maria Pia Kirk Berastain

—A press conference was held on November 27 at Mujeres Unidas y Activas’s office (MUA, Active and United Women) in Oakland announcing the results of a national survey of the work conditions of female domestic workers. The press conference celebrated the participation of different community organizations in conducting interview surveys for the investigation. “Home Economics: The Invisible and Unregulated World of Domestic Work,” which The Women’s Collective helped administer, is the first survey in the United States concerning the work conditions of domestic workers. The survey was carried out in 14 states and in nine different languages.

“We are presenting this report, which is a dream for us. Feel proud of yourselves for being part of this report and moment, it is a wonderful day…we now have the statistics and security to hold our heads high and move forward with something substantial in hand,” said Guillermina Castellanos, the Organizer of the Women’s Collective, during the press conference.

At the conference, several domestic workers shared personal experiences that highlight the results of the survey. “I am a widowed woman with six children. I am 80 years old and still work as a care-taker because it is very difficult to be old in this country; my medical expenses are very high,” said Emiliana Acopio, member of Philippine Advocates for Justice. This woman was paid $1,000 a month as the personal care taker of one person—which amounted to a pay of $2 per hour. She was obliged to do many tasks other than primary care, including cooking [for the family], caring for the family dog, and attending to the needs of other members of the family.”They needed my services all the time, there was no time to rest. They called me by knocking objects against the table. From that experience I’ve developed a traumatic [nervous] reaction to strong sounds,” she expressed through tears.

Sylvia López, leader of MUA and part of the National Domestic Worker’s Alliance, spoke about the health of domestic workers. While cleaning a house, she handled decomposed food and encountered mice inside the refrigerator.  “It was an exposure to potential diseases,” said López.

In conversations with the members of The Women’s Collective (the Colective), several reflected on the process of developing and administering the survey. “In order for someone to be interviewed, they couldn’t be part of a union or organization. When they were asked if the work was dangerous for their health, they responded that it wasn’t, because of ignorance or lack of information,” said Matilde Vásquez, member of The Collective. We discussed [while formulating the survey] the topic of using chemicals over a long period of time. The consequences [of chemical use] manifest in different ways, such as asthma, allergies, vomiting and even gastritis”, explained a member of the Women’s Collective.

The investigative team, which developed and administered the survey, was comprised of the National Domestic Worker’s Alliance (NDWA), Domestic Workers United (DWU), Instituto de Educación Popular del Sur de California (IDEPSCA), The Women’s Collective, The Center for Urban Economic Development (CUED) and Data Center. Survey development, data collection, and analysis took 3 years, under the direction of DataCenter, a research and training organization for social justice movements. For this study, DataCenter trained members of 34 community organizations to administer the domestic worker survey.

Maria Lucia Cruz and Maria Fernández, members of the Collective, and Guillermina Castellanos, attended a three-day training in Los Angeles where they helped develop a 54 question survey in Spanish. That document was translated into English, which was then translated to other languages. Colective members who were trained in Los Angeles provided training to other members who wanted to take part in conducting the survey. Each person interviewed 15-20 domestic workers in parks, on buses, and in other public places.

After all the hard work that went into this research project, a sense of happiness, hope, and victory filled the building of MUA. “To have taken the time to be here, that alone makes you a leader. Who are the leaders of this country? Mothers, women that work, their work strengthens the economy of this country. An applause for women,” said María Aguilar, member of the Collective.

Guillermina Castellanos, who led the conference, concluded with the following message:  “From these results we do not only want to mobilize workers, but also our hearts, and the passion it takes to continue fighting. Let us all sing. ‘We are here and we are here to stay,'” sang the women present.

Translation: Maricruz Gonzalez

Colectiva de Mujeres participa en encuesta nacional

De izquierda a derecha/From Left to right: Emiliana Acopio, Sylvia López, Maria Aguilar, Maria Reyes, and Guillermina Castellanos en conferencia de prensa/at the press conference. Photo: Damarys Cuevas.

De izquierda a derecha/From Left to right: Emiliana Acopio, Sylvia López, Maria Aguilar, Maria Reyes, and Guillermina Castellanos en conferencia de prensa/at the press conference. Photo: Damarys Cuevas.

Por Maria Pia Kirk Berastain

—En una conferencia de prensa que se llevó a cabo el 27 de noviembre en el edificio de MUA (Mujeres Unidas y Activas) en Oakland, se habló de la participación de distintas organizaciones y del arduo trabajo de investigación para la realización de la encuesta nacional sobre las trabajadoras domésticas. Economía del hogar: El mundo invisible y no regulado del trabajo del hogar, en la cual La Colectiva de Mujeres participó como organización ancla, es la primera en los Estados Unidos sobre las trabajadoras domésticas. La misma se realizó en 14 estados y en nueve idiomas.

“Estamos presentando este reporte que para nosotras era un sueño. Siéntanse muy orgullosas de ser parte de este reporte y legado, es un día espectacular, increíble… ya tenemos estadísticas y la seguridad para tener la frente en alto para tener de donde partir”, dijo Guillermina Castellanos en conferencia de prensa.

Durante el acto se escucharon varios testimonios, que son una muestra de lo que la encuesta refleja. “Soy viuda con seis hijos. Tengo 80 años y sigo trabajando como cuidadora porque es muy difícil ser mayor de edad en este país, mis gastos médicos son muy altos”, dijo Emiliana Acopio, integrante de Filipino Advocates for Justice. A esta señora se le pagó $1000 al mes como trabajadora interna para cuidar a una persona—equivalente a $2 por hora. Se le obligaba a hacer otros quehaceres de la casa como cocinar, cuidar al perro y atender a otros miembros de la familia. “Sin tiempo para descansar, siempre necesitaban de mis servicios a toda hora. Me llamaban golpeando objetos contra la mesa. Debido a eso he desarrollado una respuesta traumática a sonidos fuertes”, expresó entre lágrimas.

Sylvia López, líder de MUA y parte de la Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras del Hogar (NDWA), expresó su preocupación por la salud de éstas. Contó que en una ocasión tuvo que limpiar una casa donde había comida descompuesta y hasta ratones dentro del refrigerador. “Fue una manera de exponernos a algo insalubre”, dijo López.

En conversaciones con las miembros de La Colectiva de Mujeres, varias de ellas nos dieron sus impresiones al participar en la recolección de los datos. “Para que una persona fuera encuestada no podía ser miembro ni de una agencia ni de una organización. Cuando se les preguntaba si el trabajo era peligroso para su salud, ellas respondían que no, por ignorancia o falta de información”, expresó Matilde Vásquez. “Discutimos el tema de usar químicos por mucho tiempo [durante el desarrollo de las preguntas de la encuesta]. Las consecuencias [de usar químicos] se manifiestan de distintas maneras como asma, alergias, vómitos y hasta gastritis”, explicó otra miembro.

El equipo de investigación de la encuesta estuvo conformado por la Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras del Hogar (NDWA), Trabajadoras Domésticas Unidas (DWU), Instituto de Educación Popular del Sur de California (IDEPSCA), La Colectiva de Mujeres, El Centro para el Desarrollo Económico Urbano (CUED) y DataCenter. El proceso de investigación duró 3 años, siendo DataCenter, organización de investigación y capacitación para movimientos de justicia social, la encargada de capacitar a miembros en 34 organizaciones comunitarias.

María Lucia Cruz y María Fernández, miembros de La Colectiva, y Guillermina Castellanos, organizadora y cofundadora de La Colectiva de Mujeres asistieron a un retiro de tres días en Los Ángeles donde aprendieron a elaborar un cuestionario de 54 preguntas en español, estas fueron traducidas al inglés y del inglés a los otros idiomas. Cada miembro de La Colectiva que fue capacitada se encargó de entrenar a otras miembros y ellas a su vez reclutaron de 15-20 trabajadoras en parques, autobuses y otros lugares públicos.

Tras el arduo trabajo de investigación, se respiraba un aire de alegría, esperanza y victoria en el edificio de MUA. “Estar aquí las hace líderes ¿quiénes son las líderes de este país? Las madres, las mujeres que trabajamos, este trabajo hace crecer la economía de este país. Un aplauso para las mujeres”, dijo María Aguilar emocionada, miembro de La Colectiva.

Guillermina Castellanos, quien presidió la conferencia, concluyó con el siguiente mensaje: “A partir de estos resultados no sólo queremos movilizar a las trabajadoras, pero aún más a nuestros corazones y la pasión para seguir luchando. Cantemos todos ‘Aquí estamos y no nos vamos’”, cantaron los presentes.

National Survey Results

Cover of the national survey report about domestic workers

Cover of the national survey report about domestic workers.

By Maria Pia Kirk Berastain

—After suffering the recent veto of the Domestic Workers Bill of Rights in California, and a year after the successful approval of Convention  no. 189: Decent Work for Domestic Workers of the International Labour Organization (ILO) in Switzerland, the results from the survey conducted by the National Domestic Workers Alliance have brought a light of hope to the movement for domestic workers’ rights.

Home Economics: The Invisible and Unregulated World of Work Inside the Home, released on the 27th of November, presents the results of a survey in which members of The Women’s Collective administered. The report is a big step for the domestic workers’ movement in opening the eyes of those for whom domestic workers are an invisible workforce.

According to the information published in Convention No. 189 of the ILO, 52.6 million women and men over 15 years of age are primarily employed as domestic workers. This number represents about 3.6 per cent of the world’s workforce. Women constitute 43.6 million, or approximately 83 per cent of the total. Domestic workers represent 7.5 per cent of the feminine workforce employed worldwide.

The convention provides some context for the importance of domestic workers across: “Domestic work is still undervalued and made invisible. It is mainly performed by women and girls, many of whom are immigrants or are a part of disadvantaged communities. They are particularly vulnerable to discriminatory employment and exploitative work conditions, as well as other human rights abuses,” from the preamble of Convention No.189.

Despite the approval of Convention No. 189, which calls for reasonable work hours, at least 24 consecutive hours of rest per week, consolidating and standardizing forms of payments, clear information about the terms and conditions of employment, and the freedom to join a union and negotiate collectively, the Domestic Workers Bill of Rights for California, which was largely modeled after the ILO’s convention, was not approved. With the following results from the first national survey of domestic workers, injustices in the workplace are made visible in the United States. Domestic workers hope that these results will influence the future approval of a Domestic Worker’s Bill of Rights.

Two thousand and eighty-six caretakers and house cleaners were surveyed in 14 metropolitan areas. The survey was carried out in nine languages, and administered to workers of 71 nationalities. One-hundred and ninety domestic workers and organizers of 34 community organizations collaborated with the design of the survey, its implementation, and the preliminary analysis of the information.

According to results from the survey, 23% of the surveyed workers receive salaries below the state minimum wage. Seventy percent receive less than $13 an hour and 63% of in home care takers receive salaries below the minimum wage, $6.15 being the average hourly salary of surveyed women. Sixty percent of those surveyed spend more than half of their income on rent or mortgage payments, and 37 % of those surveyed have fallen behind on rent during the previous year.

The survey also touched upon the topic of workers’ health. These were the results: thirty five per cent report having worked long hours with no rest in the past 12 months. Twenty-five per cent of in home care takers had responsibilities that prevented them from having at least 5 hours of continuous rest in the week prior to taking the survey. Thirty-eight percent had suffered from work related pain in their wrists, shoulder, elbow, or hip in the last 12 months, 29 % of house cleaners have suffered skin irritation, and 20 % had respiratory problems in the last 12 months.

These statistics make visible exploitation and suffering that is common occurrence and that normally goes undocumented. In better informing ourselves, we lift stigma from around domestic workers and arm ourselves to do better by those who clean our homes and take care of our loved ones.

For more information regarding data from the national survey visit: 
http://www.domesticworkers.org/homeeconomics/

Translation: Marianella Aguirre

Resultado encuesta nacional

Portada del reporte de la encuesta nacional.

Portada del reporte de la encuesta nacional sobre trabajadoras domésticas.

Por Maria Pia Kirk Berastain

—Tras el reciente veto de la carta de derechos para los trabajadores domésticos en California (AB 889) y a un año de la exitosa aprobación del Convenio 189: Trabajo digno para las trabajadoras y trabajores domésticos de la OIT (Organización Internacional del Trabajo) en Suecia, los resultados de la encuesta hecha por la Alianza Nacional de Trabajadoras del Hogar han traído una luz de esperanza al movimiento de los derechos de los trabajores/as.

Economía del Hogar: El mundo invisible y no regulado del trabajo del hogar, anunciado el 27 de noviembre, fue como se le denominó a los resultados de la encuesta en la que miembros de La Colectiva de Mujeres participaron como encuestadoras. Esta significa un gran paso que abrirá los ojos a quienes han considerado el trabajo domestico como ‘mano invisible’.

Según los datos publicados en el Convenio 189 de la OIT, 52,6 millones de mujeres y hombres mayores de 15 años tienen como empleo principal el trabajo doméstico. Esta cifra representa alrededor del 3,6 por ciento de la fuerza de trabajo asalariada en todo el mundo. Las mujeres constituyen 43,6 millones, o aproximadamente el 83 por ciento del total. Las trabajadoras domésticas representan el 7,5 por ciento de la fuerza de trabajo femenina asalariada en todo el mundo.

El convenio comienza con esta introducción: “El trabajo doméstico continua siendo infravalorado e invisible y lo realizan principalmente las mujeres y niñas, muchas de las cuales son migrantes o forman parte de comunidades desfavorecidas y son particularmente vulnerables a la discriminación con respecto a las condiciones de empleo y de trabajo, así como a otros abusos de los derechos humanos”.

Pese a la aprobación del Convenio 189, por el cual el derecho internacional exige horas de trabajo razonables, descanso semanal de al menos 24 horas consecutivas, un límite a los pagos en especie, información clara sobre los términos y las condiciones de empleo, respeto a la libertad sindical y negociación colectiva y respeto a los principios y derechos fundamentales en el trabajo, la AB 889, que exigía puntos similares, no fue aprobada. Teniendo en cuenta los resultados de la encuesta nacional, se hacen visibles las injusticias laborales en los Estados Unidos. Trabajadoras del hogar esperan que estos resultados influyan en la futura aprobación de la Carta de Derechos.

Se encuestaron 2,086 niñeras, cuidadoras y limpiadoras de casa en 14 áreas metropolitanas. Se llevó a cabo en 9 idiomas, entrevistando a trabajadoras de 71 nacionalidades. 190 trabajadoras del hogar y organizadoras de 34 organizaciones comunitarias colaboraron con el diseño de la encuesta, la realización  de la misma y el análisis preliminar de los datos.

Según resultados de la encuesta el 23% de las trabajadoras encuestadas reciben sueldos por debajo del salario mínimo estatal. El 70% recibe menos de $13 la hora y el 63% de trabajadoras internas reciben sueldos por debajo del sueldo mínimo, siendo $6.15 el sueldo medio de las trabajadoras encuestadas.  Los salarios bajos afectan la economía del hogar. El 60% gasta más de la mitad de sus ingresos en el pago de renta e hipoteca y 37% dijeron haberse atrasado en el pago del alquiler o renta durante el año anterior a la entrevista.

La encuesta también tocó el tema de la salud de las trabajadoras. Estos fueron los resultados: treinta y cinco porciento reportan haber trabajado largas horas sin descanso en los últimos 12 meses, 25% de trabajadoras internas tuvieron responsabilidades que le impidieron tener por lo menos 5 horas de descanso la semana anterior a la entrevista. El 38% han padecido de dolor relacionado con el trabajo en la muñeca, el hombro, el codo o la cadera en los últimos 12 meses, 29% de las limpiadoras de casa han sufrido irritaciones en la piel and 20% tuvieron problemas respiratorios en los últimos 12 meses.

Estas estadísticas hacen visible la explotación y sufrimiento ocurrido comúnmente en la vida de los trabajadores/as domésticos, las cuales son raramente documentadas. A medida que nos informamos mejor, quitamos el estigma que llevan y tratamos mejor a las personas que limpian nuestras casas y cuidan a nuestros seres queridos.

Para más información sobre datos de la encuesta nacional visite: 
http://www.domesticworkers.org/homeeconomics/